Betsy O'Reilly Pate, LUTCF


Financial Services Representative

Investment Advisor Representative

Signs of a Scam...and How to Resist It

Although scammers often target older people, younger people who encounter scams are more likely to lose money to fraud, perhaps because they have less financial experience. When older people do fall for a scam, however, they tend to have higher losses.1



Regardless of your age or financial knowledge, you can be certain that criminals are hatching schemes to separate you from your money — and you should be especially vigilant in cyberspace. In a financial industry study, people who encountered scams through social media or a website were much more likely to engage with the scammer and lose money than those who were contacted by telephone, regular mail, or email.2

Here are four common practices that may help you identify a scam and avoid becoming a victim.3

Scammers pretend to be from an organization you know. They might claim to be from the IRS, the Social Security Administration, or a well-known agency or business. The IRS will never contact you by phone asking for money, and the Social Security Administration will never call to ask for your Social Security number or threaten your benefits. If you wonder whether a suspicious contact might be legitimate, contact the agency or business through a known number. Never provide personal or financial information in response to an unexpected contact.

Scammers present a problem or a prize. They might say you owe money, there’s a problem with an account, a virus on your computer, an emergency in your family, or that you won money but have to pay a fee to receive it. If you aren’t aware of owing money, you probably don’t. If you didn’t enter a contest, you can’t win a prize — and you wouldn’t have to pay for it if you did. If you are concerned about your account, call the financial institution directly. Computer problems? Contact the appropriate technical support. If your “grandchild” or other “relative” calls asking for help, ask questions only the grandchild/relative would know and check with other family members.

Scammers pressure you to act immediately. They might say you will “miss out” on a great opportunity or be “in trouble” if you don’t act now. Disengage immediately if you feel any pressure. A legitimate business will give you time to make a decision.

Scammers tell you to pay in a specific way. They may want you to send money through a wire transfer service or put funds on a gift card. Or they may send you a fake check, tell you to deposit it, and send them money. By the time you discover the check was fake, your money is gone. Never wire money or send a gift card to someone you don’t know — it’s like sending cash. And never pay money to receive money.

For more information, visit consumer.ftc.gov/features/scam-alerts.

Contact Information:

1340 Central Park Blvd Suite #202
Fredericksburg, VA 22401

Securities and investment advisory services are offered through qualified registered representatives of MML Investors Services, LLC, Member SIPC.

Supervisory office: MassMutual Greater Richmond East Shore I 100 Eastshore Dr Suite 300 Glen Allen, VA 23059 (804)346-1011

Local firms are sales offices of Massachusetts Mutual Life Insurance Company (MassMutual), and are not subsidiaries of MassMutual or it's affiliated companies.

Agent is licensed to sell life insurance in the following jurisdications: AZ, D.C., FL, MA, MD, NC, SC, TX, VA, WA, WI, and WA.

Agent is licensed to sell to sell securites in the following jurisdictions: AZ, D.C., FL, MD, NC, NY, TX, VA, and WA.

CRN202106-249050

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